Reducing Unexpected Shocks with Your Violet Wand

–managing your violet wand’s plane of operation

 

Let’s face it, when you’re playing with a violet wand, you’re going to get unexpected shocks at one time or another, whether you’re top or bottom.  They happen because electricity, even while it can be unpredictable in a lot of ways, is always trying to do at least one thing, and that is, to find the nearest route to earth.

The closest and first thing that comes near to your violet wand collet, is the first place electricity is going to go to.  Sometimes that is your hand when you don’t want it to be.  Sometimes it will be someone’s thigh when you are aiming for something else.  BUT You can prevent those unexpected shocks by being aware of the three dimensional ‘plane’ your wand works in, and practice good ‘Plane Management’.

Hold your wand like a tennis racket as shown.  This will give you the most control to manage where the wand delivers the electricity.

Then, keep your hand away from the nosecone when you hold it.  Behind this red line.  If you would hold it closer to the business end, you’re going to draw an accidental spark. 

Now you’re ready for your Plane Management.

violet wand working plane

If you’re not practising good Plane Management, you can accidentally shock someone (or yourself) from other points on the wand.

Point A as shown on the diagram is where you want your electricity to come from.

BUT if Point B is closer to the skin than point A, you are going to get electricity from point B, and that is fresh from the wand and is going to be a huge hot spark.

 

 

violet wand sparks

Your working plane is a mental area that you are setting up in your mind as you use a wand.  It is visualized by the purple line at left. 

Point A is the place where you want the wand to be closest to the skin, so that the spark comes from point A and NOT point B.

(And if your hand is too close to Point C, you’ll get some bleed there, too.  That is why you keep back behind the red line and hold the wand at the base.)

 

 

 

violet wand around curves

But bodies aren’t flat or straight, they’ve got curves and angles.  In the image at left, both Point A and Point B are equally close to the curve. 

But Point B is going to be where the shock comes from, because even while it is the same distance as Point A, the current coming from the wand is stronger straight from the wand.  Your bottom is going to get the shock from Point B here.

 

 

dont hold your violet wand down

Its natural to want to point the wand down to follow those curves, and keep the electrode (Point A) the place closest to the skin, so that the sparks jump from that and NOT Point B.  Because ideally, the distance from Point A shown at left is closer than from Point B, and that’s what you want.

But you have to re-train your self not to do that, because when you tip your wand downward, the contacts inside it shift and it loses power.  This is assuming it is a traditional Tesla Coil driven violet wand with an interruptor. 

So, go back to the basics.

 

 

And adjust your angle from the bottom up.

violet wand position

Hold the wand so that it is facing up.  This may mean dropping the user (yourself) so you are positioned below the place you want to work on.  It may mean raising the bottom partner.  But in this image, we can see that

1. the subject is not going to receive an accidental nasty spark from Point B and

2. the wand is not going to cut out because it is held at a proper angle.

and not getting a nasty spark from Point B means a smoother experience.  Unless of course, you want to dip that Point B down and deliver it.  There’s always that!

 

 

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